Chocolate Buttons

It was a specific type of buttons that Kevin liked. Annie searched through all the different types of sweets, for that elusive purple bag, with the little pig with chocolate for eyes. They were bigger than normal ones, and Kevin insisted they were crunchier, and more creamy than the other brands.

The same girl always worked behind the counter, wearing a purple t shirt, and a little silver crucifix on a chain. Annie was the only customer in the shop, and she sat with her elbows on the counter, looking off into space. She always has too much make up on, the kind where you can see the line of powder stop near the ear. 

The rain smashed down on the pavement outside lacing the glass with rivulets of water. Annie looked through the packets, past the strawberry laces, near the bigger bags of humbugs and mint imperials. But her prize was nowhere to be seen.

That usual tightness spread across her chest, that stress when unknown factors destroy a plan. Kevin will be so disappointed. 
She remembered Kevin on the first day of military service, and how smart he looked in his uniform. She thought back to the last time they spoke. The signal was appalling across thirty four million miles, and static flickered across the screen. He had been shouting, pointing at something in the sky. This made her think of flashing lights, and so many skeletons.

But that cannot be right. He needed his chocolate buttons.

She looked over to the shop lady, if only to make a connection with another human being, but through she was still on her elbows, Annie was sure that her head was slumped on the side of the counter, eyes glassy like a goldfish floating at the top of a bo-

But none of this was helping. 

It was a specific type of buttons that Kevin liked. Annie searched through all the different types of sweets, for that elusive purple bag, with the little pig with chocolate for eyes. They were bigger than normal ones, and Kevin insisted they were crunchier, and more creamy than the other brands.

The same girl always worked behind the counter, wearing a purple t shirt, and a little silver crucifix on a chain. Annie was the only customer in the shop, and she sat with her elbows on the counter, looking off into space. She always has too much make up on, the kind where you can see the line of powder stop near the ear.

The rain smashed down on the pavement outside lacing the glass with rivulets of water. Annie looked through the packets, past the strawberry laces, near the bigger bags of humbugs and mint imperials. But her prize was nowhere to be seen.

That usual tightness spread across her chest, that stress when unknown factors destroy a plan. Kevin will be so disappointed. 
She remembered Kevin with the other soldiers, marching into those big, egg shaped ships before they shot away from the earth. She thought back to the footage they sent back sometimes. Not the propaganda reels, but the grainy contraband of thrashing military men, locked in twitching, repeating spasms. 

But that cannot be right. He needed his chocolate buttons.

She looked over to the shop lady, if only to make a connection with another human being, but through she was still on her elbows, Annie was sure that her head was slumped on the side of the counter, eyes glassy like a goldfish floating at the top of a bo-

But none of this was helping. 

It was a specific type of buttons that Kevin liked. Annie searched through all the different types of sweets, for that elusive purple bag, with the little pig with chocolate for eyes. They were bigger than normal ones, and Kevin insisted they were crunchier, and more creamy than they other brands.

The same girl always worked behind the counter, wearing a purple t shirt, and a little silver crucifix on a chain. Annie was the only customer in the shop, and she sat with her elbows on the counter, looking off into space. She always has too much make up on, the kind where you can see the line of powder stop near the ear. 

The rain smashed down on the pavement outside lacing the glass with rivulets of water. Annie looked through the packets, past the strawberry laces, near the bigger bags of humbugs and mint imperials. But her prize was nowhere to be seen.

That usual tightness spread across her chest, that stress when unknown factors destroy a plan. Kevin will be so disappointed. 
She remembered Kevin first phone call home, and the way she he was hiding something, although he insisted everything was OK, and they would all be home soon. She thought back to the leaked photographs that plastered the papers before being declared a hoax. Things like spiders but with human hands, locking into a ball made of hundreds jerking bodies, a structure bigger than the tallest buildings of their home town. 

But that cannot be right. He needed his chocolate buttons.
She looked over to the shop lady, if only to make a connection with another human being, but through she was still on her elbows, Annie was sure that her head was slumped on the side of the counter, eyes glassy like a goldfish floating at the top of a bo-

But none of this was helping.

It was a specific